The clothes that bind

Yaba dancers

Two times last week – in this, the coldest March in 50 years, apparently – I put on an iro and buba. Both times, as I tied the wrapper securely about my waist, it occurred to me that London, England, is no kind of place for an iro and buba. And when I struggled to fit […]

Continue reading →

The Nigerian-British History Project

For the last few months, I have been thinking and vaguely discussing with my sister the idea of ‘something more than an oral history of Nigerians in Britain.” We all know Olaudah Equiano (hold tight, Nigerians in pre-1800 UK – braaap!) but how much do we know about the lives of British Nigerians over the […]

Continue reading →

Made In Nigeria

Yesterday on Facebook, I came across this post on Anglo-Nigerian publisher Jeremy Weate’s page: “In Aba, they make Italian-style shoes from Kano leather which are labelled “Made in Italy”. No one would buy them if they said “Made in Nigeria”, although everyone knows they are made locally. Nigerians don’t trust products made in Nigeria and […]

Continue reading →

Hit It Or Quit It?

A couple of weeks back, singer P!nk came out firmly on the side on spanking during an interview with Access Hollywood. She said: “I think parents need to beat the crap outta their kids… I think the whole spanking thing and how it’s gotten all PC is for the birds. (My dad) put me through […]

Continue reading →

All Black Everything*

Hi kids! It’s a veritable Feast of Blackness™ today on Yoruba Girl Dancing. Today marks the 50th anniversary of Nigeria’s independence from colonial rule (e ku ojo ibi!), as well as the beginning of Black History Month here in the UK. And as if that wasn’t enough, there’s Black Friday and The Friday Pretty – […]

Continue reading →

The Naija Connection

On Friday, when I met up with lovely Jeremy Weate of Naijablog, London was ‘enjoying’ a dry Nigerianesque heat of 30°C. We went to dinner at Manna [4 Erskine Road, Primrose Hill, NW3 3AJ], a vegan restaurant (Europe’s oldest: not killing things to eat since 1967). After dinner we walked up Primrose Hill – a […]

Continue reading →

Night At The Museum

A couple of nights ago, I attended a debate at the British Museum entitled Nigeria: Africa’s Superpower? I was there in a journalistic capacity – you can see the fruits of my labour here. Beforehand, I got to wander through the Kingdom of Ife exhibition, which has been hailed as a sensation, exceptional, unmissable and indeed, […]

Continue reading →

Welcome To Lagos

It got a little neglected by the audience, what with the first of the televised Leaders’ Debates on ITV1 (Boo! Hiss! Whisper it, a little bit boring!), but at 9pm last Thursday night, BBC2 aired the first in a three-part series called Welcome To Lagos. I was alerted to the programmes by blogger Vex In The City, […]

Continue reading →

Time For A Younger Brother…

Growing up with a Yoruba Nigerian mother means I’ve been privy to a great number of awesome axioms, mad metaphors and splendid sayings. There are a few greats – I was startled when I first heard someone say: “The thing that killed your brother is warning you” a not-so-veiled plea to someone to curb their excesses. For […]

Continue reading →

From Naija With Love

I was all done for the year, I swear. Then this fool gets all up in my grill, with his seasonal humdinger of a news story. Dammit, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, you just couldn’t be cool! You just had to attempt a terrorist act on a plane from Amsterdam to Detroit. You just had to have ‘links […]

Continue reading →

Black Fridays: Go Naija, Go!

Good evening, and e kaabo. Welcome to Black Fridays, tagline: cos the rest of the week ain’t Black enough! There’ve been a number of issues on this week’s Black news agenda. Let me list the ways: Keishagate and the semantics issue of still calling the band ‘Sugababes’ when no originals remain; the Mobo awards being held […]

Continue reading →